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SUBMITTED BY: Nancy Josland Dalsin

Lemony Chicken and Peppadew on Farfalle Pasta 

What is a Peppadew? 

The story of peppadew sweet and spicy fruit is not a long one. A few short years ago, the story goes, a businessman farmer spotted an unusual-looking bush in the garden of his vacation home in the Eastern Cape in South Africa. Standing shoulder-high, it was laden with small bright red fruit which looked like something between miniature red peppers and cherry tomatoes. He bit into one and discovered a mixture of peppery and sweet tastes, with a distinctive flavor. Believing that he had discovered something new, he saved seeds from the mother plant, cultivated seedlings and then developed the recipe with which to process the fruit for commercial sale (using a brine of sugar and vinegar). He named the fruit Peppadew because as it peppery but also “as sweet as the dew.” 

The peppadew has a sweet-and-sour aroma that carries through on the palate. Sweet, sharp, savory and spicy flavors with a hot back note. It is made in both mild and hot varieties. Both have the crisp texture of the more familiar hot peppers, but with a totally different flavor profile (the seeds are removed, for one thing). 

Peppadews are, in fact, peppers—the company calls them “sweet piquanté peppers in a sweet/sour brine solution.” Peppers are a fruit—a fruit is defined as a vegetable that holds its seeds internally (avocados and cucumbers are fruits too, as are all of the chili peppers). The particular species of pepper is believed to be a native of Central America but where this particular bush came is a mystery. Whatever its origins, no one looks a gift horse—or a gift bush—in the mouth: the peppadew has turned into the tastiest and most versatile flavor accent since the gherkin. 

Recipe 

6 Skinless, boneless chicken thighs, chopped into bite size pieces 

2 Cloves of Garlic, finely chopped 

1 Lemon 

Olive Oil 

Farfalle Pasta for two (I used the red, white and green bow tie pasta) 

½ a jar of Peppadew Peppers 

1 package of baby spinach leaves 

A handful of shredded basil leaves 

Parmesan shavings 

Dice the chicken thighs into bite-size pieces and place in a bowl with the garlic. Add the zest and juice of the lemon and a glug of olive oil. Mix well and leave to marinade for about an hour. 

Cook the pasta. Meanwhile, heat a frying pan and add the chicken mix (you can add extra oil if you like). stir-fry over quite a high heat so that the chicken cooks and browns a little around the edges. Once the meat has started to colour add the Peppadew Peppers. When the pasta is ready add it to the chicken, with the basil and baby spinach and mix well. Serve topped with Parmesan shavings.

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Lemony Chicken and Peppadew on Farfalle Pasta What is a Peppadew? The story of peppadew sweet and spicy fruit is not a long one. A few short years ago, the story goes, a businessman farmer spotted an unusual-looking bush in the garden of his vacation home in the Eastern Cape in South Africa. Standing shoulder-high, it was laden with small bright red fruit which looked like something between miniature red peppers and cherry tomatoes. He bit into one and discovered a mixture of peppery and sweet tastes, with a distinctive flavor. Believing that he had discovered something new, he saved seeds from the mother plant, cultivated seedlings and then developed the recipe with which to process the fruit for commercial sale (using a brine of sugar and vinegar). He named the fruit Peppadew because as it peppery but also “as sweet as the dew.” The peppadew has a sweet-and-sour aroma that carries through on the palate. Sweet, sharp, savory and spicy flavors with a hot back note. It is made in both mild and hot varieties. Both have the crisp texture of the more familiar hot peppers, but with a totally different flavor profile (the seeds are removed, for one thing). Peppadews are, in fact, peppers—the company calls them “sweet piquanté peppers in a sweet/sour brine solution.” Peppers are a fruit—a fruit is defined as a vegetable that holds its seeds internally (avocados and cucumbers are fruits too, as are all of the chili peppers). The particular species of pepper is believed to be a native of Central America but where this particular bush came is a mystery. Whatever its origins, no one looks a gift horse—or a gift bush—in the mouth: the peppadew has turned into the tastiest and most versatile flavor accent since the gherkin. Recipe 6 Skinless, boneless chicken thighs, chopped into bite size pieces 2 Cloves of Garlic, finely chopped 1 Lemon Olive Oil Farfalle Pasta for two (I used the red, white and green bow tie pasta) ½ a jar of Peppadew Peppers 1 package of baby spinach leaves A handful of shredded basil leaves Parmesan shavings Dice the chicken thighs into bite-size pieces and place in a bowl with the garlic. Add the zest and juice of the lemon and a glug of olive oil. Mix well and leave to marinade for about an hour. Cook the pasta. Meanwhile, heat a frying pan and add the chicken mix (you can add extra oil if you like). stir-fry over quite a high heat so that the chicken cooks and browns a little around the edges. Once the meat has started to colour add the Peppadew Peppers. When the pasta is ready add it to the chicken, with the basil and baby spinach and mix well. Serve topped with Parmesan shavings.

 

 

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